Daryl Conner

January 12, 2010

Ways Change Agents Can Help Sponsors

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As I wrote in my last post, even sponsors with lots of experience leading difficult transitions need the help of skilled change practitioners.

Sponsors are most effective when we help them:

Have a clear definition of the change. Effective sponsors must see the desired state clearly and understand the overall intent.

Recognize and express their dissatisfaction with the present state. Successful sponsors need to be keenly aware that the organization cannot afford to fail at the change; they have to be tenacious about fully realizing the initiative’s objectives and communicate effectively to the organization.

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November 19, 2009

The Change Practitioner’s Role in Encouraging the Right Kind of Due Diligence (Part 4 of 5)

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I hope this blog provides all its readers with a vehicle for sharing not only ideas but tools and techniques as well. At Conner Partners, we use an assessment tool to help us evaluate the overall challenge an organization is likely to encounter when implementing a particular initiative. It focuses on the three dimensions I have been writing about:

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November 17, 2009

Assessing Your Initiative’s Degree of Difficulty (Part 3 of 5)

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One of the ways agents can bolster their credibility with sponsors is by not coming across as eager to apply implementation assistance to every initiative that surfaces. This can be accomplished by encouraging sponsors to engage in a Degree of Difficulty assessment and discussion that we as agents help facilitate.

A change is difficult when it falls somewhere between easy and impossible. The “difficulty criteria” is clear (How much change is involved, the desired result, and how crucial it is to succeed). However, determining if a particular project is “in crisis” is not a cut-and-dried calculation.

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November 12, 2009

Exploring a Project’s “Degree of Difficulty” (Part 2 of 5)

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Three key factors—How much change? What’s the desired result? How crucial is it to succeed?—help determine a change initiative’s Degree of Difficulty. Let’s look at these in detail.

DETERMINING HOW MUCH CHANGE IS EXPECTED

Projects of a continuous improvement nature (dealing with incremental change) have an important place within organizations. Without Six Sigma and other such methodologies to keep a constant vigilance on quality enhancement opportunities, organizations would never harvest the full potential from their processes and procedures.

Transformational change, on the other hand, dramatically alters the course of current actions.

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