Daryl Conner

June 1, 2010

Use Mindset and Behavior Patterns to Your Advantage

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Once you understand that a specific mindset and its associated behaviors can either facilitate or impede success, you have a level of insight that can be truly invaluable to a sponsor who is less familiar with these kinds of change dynamics.

Mindsets are made up of frames of reference (the ways individuals make sense of situations) that lead to the formation of priorities (the relative importance of various options). Shared mindsets within an organization serve as the foundations of culture and ultimately lead to common patterns of behavior.

Successful change requires a specific mindset that is shared among key players as they perform their respective roles. This “success mindset” reflects the

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November 19, 2009

The Change Practitioner’s Role in Encouraging the Right Kind of Due Diligence (Part 4 of 5)

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I hope this blog provides all its readers with a vehicle for sharing not only ideas but tools and techniques as well. At Conner Partners, we use an assessment tool to help us evaluate the overall challenge an organization is likely to encounter when implementing a particular initiative. It focuses on the three dimensions I have been writing about:

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November 17, 2009

Assessing Your Initiative’s Degree of Difficulty (Part 3 of 5)

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One of the ways agents can bolster their credibility with sponsors is by not coming across as eager to apply implementation assistance to every initiative that surfaces. This can be accomplished by encouraging sponsors to engage in a Degree of Difficulty assessment and discussion that we as agents help facilitate.

A change is difficult when it falls somewhere between easy and impossible. The “difficulty criteria” is clear (How much change is involved, the desired result, and how crucial it is to succeed). However, determining if a particular project is “in crisis” is not a cut-and-dried calculation.

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November 12, 2009

Exploring a Project’s “Degree of Difficulty” (Part 2 of 5)

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Three key factors—How much change? What’s the desired result? How crucial is it to succeed?—help determine a change initiative’s Degree of Difficulty. Let’s look at these in detail.

DETERMINING HOW MUCH CHANGE IS EXPECTED

Projects of a continuous improvement nature (dealing with incremental change) have an important place within organizations. Without Six Sigma and other such methodologies to keep a constant vigilance on quality enhancement opportunities, organizations would never harvest the full potential from their processes and procedures.

Transformational change, on the other hand, dramatically alters the course of current actions.

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