Daryl Conner

June 18, 2013

Falling Asleep at the Wheel

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I’m continuing with my answers to practitioners’ questions on character and presence. In this third post of the series, I address concerns about our tendency to “fall asleep” rather than come to terms with who we are and its place in practicing the craft.

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May 28, 2013

Connecting the Dots between Character, Presence, and Client Effectiveness

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I asked several practitioners whom I respect to write guest posts about how they related to two previously released series: Character/Presence and Cultivating Character. Luc Galoppin, a seasoned change professional, is the fifth and final contributor to this series.
In this post, Luc suggests a way to work with what we have to connect the dots between our character and presence and the profession we are in service to.

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February 19, 2013

The Practitioner’s Journey: Departure

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In this series, I’m using Joseph Campbell’s “The Hero’s Journey” to relate some specific implications of the hero archetype to the path many seasoned change practitioners follow as they come to terms with how they work with clients. In this post, I introduce Sara, a change practitioner, as the protagonist who first struggles to break out of her perfunctory role, but who eventually earns her standing as a hero.

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February 5, 2013

It’s Time to Wake Up

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In this series, I have been exploring the notion that, as practitioners, we can easily lose contact with who we really are and the important role our character plays in helping clients realize their change aspirations. In this final post in the series, I’ll share some thoughts on uncovering and keeping a vigilance on our character…”waking up” and maintaining a mindfulness about who we are when we practice our craft.

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November 20, 2012

The Importance of Affirmation

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For most people, personal sovereignty (the capacity to operate primarily under one’s own authority) requires rewiring some neural circuitry that has been in place since they were toddlers. This is not easily done and helps explain why so many, including change practitioners, devote much of their lives to accommodating the wishes of others rather than being true to who they really are. In this post, I’ll describe some of the factors that help develop this kind of independence.

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